I handed back the CGM yesterday and asked "where do I sign up?" to get one of my own. That's because, while I wouldn't want to be tethered to it constantly, the peace of mind—and the guts to more aggressively manage my diabetes—that little black device offers would be worth it. Totally. Turns out lots of people use it during certain times, such as when their numbers aren't making sense, overnight, or maybe during a long hike.

After going over the downloaded graphs, as well as my log book, Erica (the nurse, not our HR manager) and I made some changes to my dosing, as well as to my routine, to see if that fixed a few, shall we say, less than optimal patterns. I can report that after one day, I can already see major improvement in sugar trends.

I filled out the paperwork to get the process rolling and to see what my insurance will cover and what my out-of-pocket would be. Looking online, they seem to run about $1,200, not including the sensors. And it comes in pink or blue, in addition to black. I'll keep you posted. I can't wipe out my entire HSA on this but I think I can swing it.

Meanwhile, one technology trend I am not sure of: Google's blood sugar detecting contact lenses, which has received quite a bit of press in the last week or so. I know from social media that many patients say they'd only consider the lenses if they already needed contacts, which makes a certain sense, I guess. I just find it hard to believe technology is anywhere close to being able to track blood glucose levels without actually sampling blood.

Theresa Flaherty
Type 1